Volume 26, Issue 68 p. 15835-15838
Communication

Chemical Communication between Organometallic Single-Chain Polymer Nanoparticles

Victoria Kobernik

Victoria Kobernik

Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 84105 Israel

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Dr. Inbal Berkovich

Dr. Inbal Berkovich

Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 84105 Israel

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Dr. Avishai Levy

Dr. Avishai Levy

Schulich Faculty of Chemistry and Russell-Berrie Nanotechnology Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel

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Prof. Dr. N. Gabriel Lemcoff

Prof. Dr. N. Gabriel Lemcoff

Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 84105 Israel

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Prof. Dr. Charles E. Diesendruck

Corresponding Author

Prof. Dr. Charles E. Diesendruck

Schulich Faculty of Chemistry and Russell-Berrie Nanotechnology Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel

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First published: 31 July 2020
Citations: 3

Dedicated to Professor Pierre H. Dixneuf for his outstanding contributions to organometallic chemistry and catalysis

Graphical Abstract

Macromolecular chemical communication: A rhodium complex is used for chemical communication between two polymer chains, causing the unfolding of one and the folding of the other. The chemical communication is mainly controlled by effective molarity, circumventing thermodynamic preference. The chemical communication causes dramatic changes in chain properties, such as hydrodynamic volume and intrinsic viscosity.

Abstract

Chemical communication between macromolecules was studied by observing the controlled single chain collapse that ensues the exchange of a metal cross-linker between two polymer chains. The rhodium (I) organometallic cross-linker transfer from a low molecular weight collapsed polybutadiene to a larger polymer was followed using size exclusion chromatography. The increased effective molarity in the larger polymer seems to be the driving force for the metal migration. Thus, we demonstrate here a strategy for transferring a molecular signal that induces chain collapse of a polymer chain based on non-covalent interactions, mimicking biological behaviors reminiscent of signal transductions in proteins.