Volume 28, Issue 39 e202201180
Research Article

HPLC-Based Automated Synthesis of Glycans in Solution

Dr. Samira Escopy

Dr. Samira Escopy

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri - St. Louis, One University Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri, 63121 USA

Department of Chemistry, Saint Louis University, 3501 Laclede Ave, St. Louis, Missouri, 63103 USA

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Dr. Yashapal Singh

Dr. Yashapal Singh

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri - St. Louis, One University Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri, 63121 USA

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Prof. Keith J. Stine

Prof. Keith J. Stine

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri - St. Louis, One University Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri, 63121 USA

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Prof. Alexei V. Demchenko

Corresponding Author

Prof. Alexei V. Demchenko

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri - St. Louis, One University Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri, 63121 USA

Department of Chemistry, Saint Louis University, 3501 Laclede Ave, St. Louis, Missouri, 63103 USA

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First published: 05 May 2022
Citations: 4

Graphical Abstract

A new experimental set-up for a HPLC-A in solution system includes the following modifications: 4-way split valve, in-line molecular sieve cartridge and a fraction collector, which enabled fully automated batch synthesis of multiple oligosaccharides with the single press of a button.

Abstract

As the 21st century unfolds with rapid changes, new challenges in research and development emerge. These new challenges prompted us to repurpose our HPLC−A platform that was previously used in solid phase glycan synthesis to a solution phase batch synthesis described herein. The modular character of HPLC allows for implementing new attachments. To enable sequential synthesis of multiple oligosaccharides with the single press of a button, we supplemented our system with a four-way split valve and an automated fraction collector. This enabled the operator to load all reagents and all reactants in the autosampler, press the button to start the repetitive automation sequence, leave the lab, and upon return find products of multiple reactions ready for purification, analysis, and subsequent application.

Data Availability Statement

The data that support the findings of this study are available in the supplementary material of this article.