Volume 29, Issue 2 e202203930
Cover Profile
Free Access

Sustainable Production of Molybdenum Carbide (MXene) from Fruit Wastes for Improved Solar Evaporation

Marliyana Aizudin

Marliyana Aizudin

Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 637616 Singapore

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Murali Krishna Sudha

Murali Krishna Sudha

Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 637616 Singapore

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Dr. Ronn Goei

Dr. Ronn Goei

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 639798 Singapore

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Dr. Shun Kuang Lua

Dr. Shun Kuang Lua

School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 637459 Singapore

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Rafeeque Poolamuri Pottammel

Rafeeque Poolamuri Pottammel

Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Thiruvananthapuram, 695551 India

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Prof. Alfred Iing Yoong Tok

Prof. Alfred Iing Yoong Tok

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 639798 Singapore

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Prof. Edison Huixiang Ang

Corresponding Author

Prof. Edison Huixiang Ang

Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 637616 Singapore

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First published: 29 December 2022

Graphical Abstract

Abstract

Invited for the cover of this issue is the group of Edison Huixiang Ang at the National Institute of Education, an institute of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. The image depicts the sustainable fabrication of two-dimensional MXene sheets from the upcycling of fruit waste for solar desalination. Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/chem.202203184.

How would you describe your research?

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Our research group focuses on “Nanotech”, specifically two-dimensional nanomaterials with sheet-like structure 10 000 times thinner than human hair. Edison leads a group of researchers that are researching the fundamentals of nanomaterials, developing low-cost processing methods, and creating sustainable materials to address critical issues in the real world.

What future opportunities do you see (in the light of the results presented in this paper)?

This study employs a novel method for producing valuable MXene materials from upcycling of fruit wastes in a simple two-step carbonization process. This manufacturing technique provides alternative way to make MXenes in a sustainable and low-cost manner, while mitigating waste pollution. Manufacturing technology advancements have revolutionized the customization of functional materials. However, it is critical not to lose sight of the importance of remaining sustainable in the process. The use of solar energy (electricity-free) to generate clean water is very useful for disaster relief in remote areas, and the scalable MXenes, which outperform commercial solar absorbers, enable the translation of lab scale to pilot plant production for practical implementation. Two-dimensional MXene layers’ beneficial properties such as high specific surface area, tunable surface terminal groups, superb electrical conductivity, and adjustable interlayer channels provide new opportunities in applications such as rechargeable batteries, membrane filtration, biosensors and catalysis.

What other topics are you working on at the moment?

Our current research interests combine nanotechnology, materials science and additive manufacturing approaches to develop functional nanostructures, sustainable materials, and smart materials for advanced energy storage, membrane technology, catalysis and sensing applications. image