Volume 85, Issue 7 p. 1487-1497
Minireview

Illuminating Cellular Biochemistry: Fluorogenic Chemogenetic Biosensors for Biological Imaging

Fanny Broch

Fanny Broch

Sorbonne Université, École normale supérieure, PSL University, CNRS Laboratoire des biomolécules, LBM, 75005 Paris, France

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Prof. Arnaud Gautier

Corresponding Author

Prof. Arnaud Gautier

Sorbonne Université, École normale supérieure, PSL University, CNRS Laboratoire des biomolécules, LBM, 75005 Paris, France

Institut Universitaire de France, France

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First published: 22 June 2020
Citations: 12

Graphical Abstract

Glowing report: Chemists and biologists have recently built and developed a large collection of fluorogenic chemogenetic biosensors enabling to visualize and study cellular biochemistry in new ways. This Minireview focuses on the new perspectives offered by fluorogenic reporters consisting of a protein or RNA tag that can complex either an endogenous or a synthetic fluorogenic dye (so-called fluorogen) to design unique and innovative biosensors, thus pushing the boundaries of cellular imaging.

Abstract

Cellular activity is defined by the precise spatiotemporal regulation of various components, such as ions, small molecules, or proteins. Studying cell physiology consequently requires the optical recording of these processes, notably by using fluorescent biosensors. The recent development of various fluorogenic systems greatly expanded the palette of reporters to be included in these sensors design. Fluorogenic reporters consist of a protein or RNA tag that can complex either an endogenous or a synthetic fluorogenic dye (so-called fluorogen). The intrinsic nature of these tags, along with the high tunability of their cognate chromophore provide interesting features such as far-red to near-infrared emission, oxygen independence, or unprecedented color versatility. These engineered photoreceptors, self-labelling proteins, or noncovalent aptamers and protein tags were rapidly identified as promising reporters to observe biological events. This Minireview focuses on the new perspectives they offer to design unique and innovative biosensors, thus pushing the boundaries of cellular imaging.